Summertime SWEP (and more)

By Alyssa Boge, Education Coordinator

Before you turn in your papers, do you always go over them to check for mistakes?  If it’s a must, Collections, Compliance, or Archaeology work might be right for you!

This was one of the questions (and one of the answers) on a quiz that Randean Osceola helped create for the UNITY (United National Indian Tribal Youth) conference in Orlando.  The goal was to get tribal students attending the conference to think about possible careers with tribal museums or Tribal Historic Preservation Offices (THPOs)—something Randean is very familiar with.  She has been volunteering or interning with us for several years now and has worked in various divisions and sections of the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum and THPO.  It’s been exciting to see her grow both personally and professionally from then to now.  This summer she gave a talk about Native American Women to teachers at Piper High School in Sunrise, FL, helped edit text about the Tribe’s history for the Seminole Tribe of Florida website, worked on archaeological reports, and helped design a product for the store.

Luckily for us, Randean isn’t the only student who returned to work with us this summer!  Students joined us either by volunteering or through a program called the Student Work Experience Program, or SWEP.  SWEP is administered through the Tribe’s Center for Student Success and Services and facilitates work opportunities during spring break and summer.  The goal is to help students gain professional development experience.

Some students who joined us last summer returned for both the spring and summer program this year like Chandler DeMayo.  One of his big projects this summer was to work on a coloring page that we will use in our next activity booklet.  Print it off, color it in, and send us a pic!

Blog 1
Chandler’s epic coloring page for our activity book! 

Other students who came this spring, like Aujua Williams and Avery Bowers, also joined us for the summer.  In the picture below, they are looking at a yearbook in the Curatorial Lab.  This summer, they both helped out with our summer camp groups and worked on our teaching collection, among many other things.  For example, Avery worked with the Archaeometry section, too.

Blog 2
Aujua and Avery examine a yearbook in the Curatorial Lab

Some students who had joined us for SWEP last year or this spring came back to volunteer like Clarice DeMayo, Jalycia Billie-Valdez, and Andrew Bowers.  They were able to help with Collections – organizing and housing photos from the Seminole Tribune, inventorying the collection, helping with cataloging objects, and creating mounts for objects to be used on exhibit. We are always excited when Jalycia helps out—she has such neat handwriting which is perfect for the task at hand!

Blog 3
Jalycia’s neat handwriting – perfect for Collections work

This year we had a total of seven students join us to volunteer or intern through SWEP!  The last two summers we’ve seen an increase in the number of participants.  While these programs offer students community service hours, work experience, and a chance to delve deeper into their history, we also learn from students.  I always find out something I didn’t know before from Chandler.  Did you know earlier stickball sticks were more like giant spoons?  I didn’t!  Just as we learn from them, we hope they learn from us – beyond the technical know-how of Museum work.  And of course, we hope to see them again!

Blog 4
Historic Image of Stickball sticks GRP1896.251

These aren’t the only programs we offer.  We also offer internships for local Ahfachkee students and internships and volunteer opportunities for non Tribal members.  You can find out more about those programs here: https://www.ahtahthiki.com/downloads/Intern-and-Volunteer-Program-Guide-6.4.2019.pdf.

Blog 5
Jack shows Avery and Andrew a site on the Tribal Register of Historic Places during a field trip

 

Advertisements

Seminole Chickees: Unconquered Architecture

By Carrie Dilley, Visitor Services and Development Manager

While we constantly aim to engage with and educate our visitors, we also strive to break down stereotypes and represent Seminoles as modern and diverse. We want our visitors to walk away with the understanding that although they share many commonalities with other tribes, Seminoles also maintain their unique culture and traditions.

Chickees Are Not Tipis

We get excited when our visitors ask us questions. In particular, the one we hear quite frequently is “did Seminoles live in tipis?” Most visitors, especially if they are from Florida, would be able to look at a chickee and say, “Yes, I have seen those before!”  Often confused with a tiki hut or other open-sided thatched structures, the chickee (or Seminole home) was traditionally constructed of palmetto and cypress. Over time, chickees adapted to incorporate the use of more readily available materials such as pressure-treated pine for the structural components.  While similar in appearance and materials to other thatched dwellings, a structure can only be called a chickee if constructed by Seminoles or Miccosukees.

88 BC 00001

Who Needs Air Conditioning?

Our visitors are sometimes astonished when we tell them that Seminoles lived in chickees year-round. Most people who live in enclosed homes cannot picture living in a home without walls.  However, we ask our visitors to imagine the temperature difference when you incorporate beautiful cross-breezes versus trying to stay cool in the middle of August in an enclosed structure with no air conditioning.  The temperature beneath a chickee is 10-15 degrees cooler than the outside air.  As a result, the chickee is comfortable in less than ideal temperatures.  In addition, the open sides enhance structural stability during hurricanes as the winds blow straight through it.  Chickees fare quite well during inclement weather and typically suffer only from some ruffled palm fronds.

For the most part chickees are not primary homes for Tribal members. However, they are still a prevalent and critical part of Seminole culture. Today, chickees are as unique as their owners.  They have adapted with time yet remain a hallmark of Seminole tradition.

88 BC 00069

Cultural History Beyond a Simple Internet Search

When I Googled “Seminole chickee,” the Tribe’s website surprisingly does not come up as the top result. As more people come to know and understand the unique architectural and cultural history of indigenous peoples, we hope that researchers, students, and the interested public will come to the tribes themselves for information.  If you would like to come visit the museum and utilize our amazing library for research, feel free to call us at 877-902-1113 to set up an appointment with our research coordinator.  Also, be sure to check out our online database, as well as Florida Memory’s wonderful collection of images and information. You will be glad that you did!

88 BC 00185

 

 

How can you plan a group visit to the Museum?

By Alyssa Boge, Education Coordinator

Did you know the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum offers special programs for groups? Whether you have a group of students or a family reunion, we’d love to host you!

What is a group?

A group is any gathering of 10 or more people. You can bring your family, a club, scout troop, students, or any group of people who want to be a part of a shared experience.

What are the perks of being a group?

Admission for groups starts at $5/person. Groups can also sign up for additional programs such as tours and games!

How do I sign up?

In order to receive the group admission rate or set up a tour program for your group, all you have to do is call me (Alyssa Boge–Education Coordinator) at 863-902-1113 x12225 or send me an email at alyssaboge@semtribe.com.  I’m more than happy to work with you to customize your visit!

What types of programs are available?

There are many different programs available. Select the program that works best for your group.

Tours

Museum Film + Guided Gallery Tour (1 hour)

Start your visit with our panoramic film that provides an overview of Seminole history and culture. Next, explore our diorama style exhibits that transport you back in time as you discover Seminole culture. Our experienced guides will share the Seminole story with you and answer any questions during this interactive tour.

*Perfect for all ages

Marty Tour

Guided Boardwalk Tour (1 hour)

Explore our boardwalk which takes you through the Cypress Dome with a knowledgeable guide. As you walk our mile-long boardwalk, you’ll discover the Florida Everglades and how Seminoles used the ecosystem’s resources to survive and thrive.

*Perfect for all ages. Wheelchairs are available for those who wish to use them.

Boardwalk

Crafts

Beaded Bracelet (30 minutes)

Be inspired by Seminole beadwork to create your own beaded bracelet.

*This activity is great for all ages.

Beaded Keychain (45 minutes)

Create your own beaded keychain using Seminole colors.

*This activity is best for 4th grade and up.

Everglades Watercolors (45 minutes-1 hour)

Discover Seminole artists and how they’ve been inspired by the Florida Everglades. An instructor will show you how you can create your own Everglades painting using watercolor pencils.

*This activity is best for adults.

everglades-watercolor.jpg

Games

Knee Bone (20 minutes)

Toss the knee bone of a cow into the air to see where it lands and how many points you can get!

*This activity can be played by preschoolers and up.

Tools of Survival (30 minutes)

Would you survive the Seminole Wars? Find out with this card based game.

*This activity is best for 4th grade and up.

Tools of Survival

We Are Here (30 minutes)

Piece together a puzzle showcasing how Seminole Tribal government functions while exploring our newest exhibit that highlights the many Tribal departments.

*This activity is best for 4th grade and up.

How much does it cost?

Rates vary for student versus adult groups and all group packages start at just $5 a person. Check out our website for a detailed breakdown of package prices, or call/email us today for a personalized quote!

Through our Culture Access Program, we also provide gallery and boardwalk tours free of charge for Title 1 Schools and non-profit organizations serving low income, disadvantaged youth, or at risk persons.

Are meals provided?

The Museum doesn’t offer concessions. However, you are more than welcome to bring your own lunch and use our picnic area. You may also consider scheduling lunch at the Swamp Water Café inside Billie Swamp Safari.

Does the Museum have a Gift Shop?

The Museum does have a store where you can find custom Native American keepsakes to help you reminisce about your visit. If you are limited on time, consider purchasing our Museum Store Goodie Bags. Simply complete an order form in advance of your visit and pick the items up when you come. You can also order anytime online at the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum Store.

Museum Store Goodie Bag

What else should I know about visiting?

Make sure to give yourself enough time to get to the Museum as we are located on the Big Cypress Seminole Reservation. You can find directions here: https://www.ahtahthiki.com/downloads/AhTahThiKi_Map_2016_prf2.pdf.

You may wish to a bring a sweater since it can get cold in the Museum.  For boardwalk tours, consider bringing along bug spray, sunscreen, and cash for purchasing items in the village.

Review the rules with your group before visiting. No food or drinks besides water are allowed inside the Museum. Photography is allowed, but flash photography is not permitted inside the galleries.

On your trip out to Big Cypress, we highly recommend making a day of it by also visiting Billie Swamp Safari.  Our Everglades Adventure Park, also owned and operated by the Seminole Tribe of Florida, is only 3 miles away!  Call them at 863-983-6101 to schedule your experience which may include an airboat and/swamp buggy ride, along with wildlife presentations.

Where can I stay overnight?

For overnight visits, we have two major options.  You can rent private chickees or chickee dorms at Billie Swamp Safari. You can also rent a cabin, tent space, or RV spot at the Big Cypress RV Resort by calling 863-983-1330.

We hope to see you soon!

 

 

 

 

The American Indian Arts Celebration Now In Its 21st Year

By Matt Koenig, Last Call Marketing

Filmmakers John and Kenn Little will headline the 21st annual American Indian Arts Celebration (AIAC) presented by The Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum. They join us on the heels of touring the nation to discuss their 2017 debut documentary More Than a Word. This year’s event is hosted on the museum grounds in the Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation on November 2-3. Visitors can enjoy traditional and contemporary arts and crafts, dance and music of the Seminole, Southeastern and other Indian tribes from across the country.

From exciting entertainment, wildlife shows to fantastic food trucks, there is something for everyone. This is an event for the entire family and not to be missed.  The sensational backdrop for this event is the scenic Florida Everglades. The rich blue skies, verdant fields, and miles of sawgrass and hammocks provide the ultimate setting for this amazing celebration. Here’s a peak at our top entertainment:

John & Kenn Little

Little(3)Brothers John Little and Kenn Little are originally from Denver, CO are members of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in North Dakota.

John Little is currently a PhD student at the University of Minnesota. He recently completed his master’s degree in history at the University of South Dakota and is working on completing his Educational Doctorate. His thesis was on the Lakota and the Vietnam War. His goals are to write Indigenous people in the historical narrative and help Native students into higher education. His primary focus is on Native American veterans, music, cultural appropriation, and mascots.

Kenn Little is a graphic designer and filmmaker currently residing in Kansas City, MO. John received his bachelor’s degree in graphic design and new media from Full Sail University. His experiences include print design, typography, digital design, music and video. He has several short films and music videos to his credit.

Nakotah LaRance

nakotah6-time World Hoop Dance Champion and Native American Actor. He currently does both public and private performances. He was a principal dancer for Cirque Du Soleil’s “Totem” show and now does special projects for them.

Native Pride

2017-09-28_10-12-30

An internationally known high-energy show featuring an innovative blend of modern and traditional Native American dance styles.

Anthony Balentine

anthony balentine

Better known by his stage name Aye Five, is an unsigned rapper from the Big Cypress Reservation.  He will be joined by Carradine and DC.

Billy Walker

An alligator wrestler and storyteller from the Big Cypress Reservation. Billy began wrestling alligators in the 1980s and still catches alligators to use for his shows. He feels that gator wrestling is a way to preserve the traditions of the Seminole Tribe of Florida.

21st Annual American Indian Arts Celebration at a Glance

Friday, November 2, 2018 10 AM – 5 PM

Saturday, November 3, 2018 10 AM – 7 PM

Native American Art Vendors

Special Presentations

Music / Dance

Wildlife Shows

Food Trucks / Beverages

Same Day Free Admission to Museum

Free Parking

 

Telling Our Stories Gains Momentum

By Carrie Dilley, Visitor Services and Development Manager

Here on our blog we like to give our readers a sneak peek behind-the-scenes and share the “how” and the “why” behind what we do.  We constantly strive to find new ways to share the Seminole story and help preserve Seminole history.  It’s critical that we stay relevant in the Seminole community and in the Museum field as a whole.

We opened our doors in 1997 and helped make a name for tribal museums across the country.  Over the past 20 years we have created and hosted top-notch exhibits and programs, and vastly increased our collection.  But over the past few years there’s been a desire to do more.  Share more. Exhibit more.  Educate more.

In 2015, we officially embarked on a journey to tell more of the Seminole story within our four walls.  Our current exhibits are great, but they are limited in their scope and only tell a small part of the overall story.  We try to fill in some of the gaps by utilizing our temporary exhibition spaces to highlight topics not covered in our permanent galleries, but we still lack the opportunity to completely immerse our visitors in Seminole history and culture.

By working directly with the Seminole community, our Exhibits team has overseen the development of a plan that utilizes the existing overall space to provide a dynamic experience full of oral histories, vivid imagery, and facets of culture that help us fulfill our mission.  In the exhibit redesign plan, the exterior of the Museum will remain unchanged, but the interior of the structure will be completely re-imagined save for the library, archives, and restrooms.  Studio Techtonic, the exhibition design firm we hired to head up the project, has just completed the schematic plans, which ready us for the next phase in the process—development of the construction documents.  We anticipate we have another 2-3 years until the project is complete, but we grow more excited with each step.

blog pic 1

Last year we launched Telling Our Stories, an $8 million campaign to make the redesign project a reality.  We are proud of what we accomplished and well aware that we couldn’t have done it alone. With the continued support of our donors and the Seminole Tribe of Florida we have reached our initial 500K milestone.

Please make a gift to Telling Our Stories Campaign today to preserve one of the Seminole Tribe of Florida’s most definitive cultural resources.  You can help us ensure that everyone has the opportunity to enjoy the powerful stories the Museum has to tell. Your tax-deductible gift to the Telling Our Stories Campaign, in any amount, impacts our work. Thank you for your continued support.

If you would like to learn more about how you can help us meet our goals, please contact us at: (carriedilley@semtribe.com)  or simply visit www.ahtahthiki.com/donate!

Telling Our Stories Logo