How can you plan a group visit to the Museum?

By Alyssa Boge, Education Coordinator

Did you know the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum offers special programs for groups? Whether you have a group of students or a family reunion, we’d love to host you!

What is a group?

A group is any gathering of 10 or more people. You can bring your family, a club, scout troop, students, or any group of people who want to be a part of a shared experience.

What are the perks of being a group?

Admission for groups starts at $5/person. Groups can also sign up for additional programs such as tours and games!

How do I sign up?

In order to receive the group admission rate or set up a tour program for your group, all you have to do is call me (Alyssa Boge–Education Coordinator) at 863-902-1113 x12225 or send me an email at alyssaboge@semtribe.com.  I’m more than happy to work with you to customize your visit!

What types of programs are available?

There are many different programs available. Select the program that works best for your group.

Tours

Museum Film + Guided Gallery Tour (1 hour)

Start your visit with our panoramic film that provides an overview of Seminole history and culture. Next, explore our diorama style exhibits that transport you back in time as you discover Seminole culture. Our experienced guides will share the Seminole story with you and answer any questions during this interactive tour.

*Perfect for all ages

Marty Tour

Guided Boardwalk Tour (1 hour)

Explore our boardwalk which takes you through the Cypress Dome with a knowledgeable guide. As you walk our mile-long boardwalk, you’ll discover the Florida Everglades and how Seminoles used the ecosystem’s resources to survive and thrive.

*Perfect for all ages. Wheelchairs are available for those who wish to use them.

Boardwalk

Crafts

Beaded Bracelet (30 minutes)

Be inspired by Seminole beadwork to create your own beaded bracelet.

*This activity is great for all ages.

Beaded Keychain (45 minutes)

Create your own beaded keychain using Seminole colors.

*This activity is best for 4th grade and up.

Everglades Watercolors (45 minutes-1 hour)

Discover Seminole artists and how they’ve been inspired by the Florida Everglades. An instructor will show you how you can create your own Everglades painting using watercolor pencils.

*This activity is best for adults.

everglades-watercolor.jpg

Games

Knee Bone (20 minutes)

Toss the knee bone of a cow into the air to see where it lands and how many points you can get!

*This activity can be played by preschoolers and up.

Tools of Survival (30 minutes)

Would you survive the Seminole Wars? Find out with this card based game.

*This activity is best for 4th grade and up.

Tools of Survival

We Are Here (30 minutes)

Piece together a puzzle showcasing how Seminole Tribal government functions while exploring our newest exhibit that highlights the many Tribal departments.

*This activity is best for 4th grade and up.

How much does it cost?

Rates vary for student versus adult groups and all group packages start at just $5 a person. Check out our website for a detailed breakdown of package prices, or call/email us today for a personalized quote!

Through our Culture Access Program, we also provide gallery and boardwalk tours free of charge for Title 1 Schools and non-profit organizations serving low income, disadvantaged youth, or at risk persons.

Are meals provided?

The Museum doesn’t offer concessions. However, you are more than welcome to bring your own lunch and use our picnic area. You may also consider scheduling lunch at the Swamp Water Café inside Billie Swamp Safari.

Does the Museum have a Gift Shop?

The Museum does have a store where you can find custom Native American keepsakes to help you reminisce about your visit. If you are limited on time, consider purchasing our Museum Store Goodie Bags. Simply complete an order form in advance of your visit and pick the items up when you come. You can also order anytime online at the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum Store.

Museum Store Goodie Bag

What else should I know about visiting?

Make sure to give yourself enough time to get to the Museum as we are located on the Big Cypress Seminole Reservation. You can find directions here: https://www.ahtahthiki.com/downloads/AhTahThiKi_Map_2016_prf2.pdf.

You may wish to a bring a sweater since it can get cold in the Museum.  For boardwalk tours, consider bringing along bug spray, sunscreen, and cash for purchasing items in the village.

Review the rules with your group before visiting. No food or drinks besides water are allowed inside the Museum. Photography is allowed, but flash photography is not permitted inside the galleries.

On your trip out to Big Cypress, we highly recommend making a day of it by also visiting Billie Swamp Safari.  Our Everglades Adventure Park, also owned and operated by the Seminole Tribe of Florida, is only 3 miles away!  Call them at 863-983-6101 to schedule your experience which may include an airboat and/swamp buggy ride, along with wildlife presentations.

Where can I stay overnight?

For overnight visits, we have two major options.  You can rent private chickees or chickee dorms at Billie Swamp Safari. You can also rent a cabin, tent space, or RV spot at the Big Cypress RV Resort by calling 863-983-1330.

We hope to see you soon!

 

 

 

 

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The American Indian Arts Celebration Now In Its 21st Year

By Matt Koenig, Last Call Marketing

Filmmakers John and Kenn Little will headline the 21st annual American Indian Arts Celebration (AIAC) presented by The Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum. They join us on the heels of touring the nation to discuss their 2017 debut documentary More Than a Word. This year’s event is hosted on the museum grounds in the Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation on November 2-3. Visitors can enjoy traditional and contemporary arts and crafts, dance and music of the Seminole, Southeastern and other Indian tribes from across the country.

From exciting entertainment, wildlife shows to fantastic food trucks, there is something for everyone. This is an event for the entire family and not to be missed.  The sensational backdrop for this event is the scenic Florida Everglades. The rich blue skies, verdant fields, and miles of sawgrass and hammocks provide the ultimate setting for this amazing celebration. Here’s a peak at our top entertainment:

John & Kenn Little

Little(3)Brothers John Little and Kenn Little are originally from Denver, CO are members of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in North Dakota.

John Little is currently a PhD student at the University of Minnesota. He recently completed his master’s degree in history at the University of South Dakota and is working on completing his Educational Doctorate. His thesis was on the Lakota and the Vietnam War. His goals are to write Indigenous people in the historical narrative and help Native students into higher education. His primary focus is on Native American veterans, music, cultural appropriation, and mascots.

Kenn Little is a graphic designer and filmmaker currently residing in Kansas City, MO. John received his bachelor’s degree in graphic design and new media from Full Sail University. His experiences include print design, typography, digital design, music and video. He has several short films and music videos to his credit.

Nakotah LaRance

nakotah6-time World Hoop Dance Champion and Native American Actor. He currently does both public and private performances. He was a principal dancer for Cirque Du Soleil’s “Totem” show and now does special projects for them.

Native Pride

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An internationally known high-energy show featuring an innovative blend of modern and traditional Native American dance styles.

Anthony Balentine

anthony balentine

Better known by his stage name Aye Five, is an unsigned rapper from the Big Cypress Reservation.  He will be joined by Carradine and DC.

Billy Walker

An alligator wrestler and storyteller from the Big Cypress Reservation. Billy began wrestling alligators in the 1980s and still catches alligators to use for his shows. He feels that gator wrestling is a way to preserve the traditions of the Seminole Tribe of Florida.

21st Annual American Indian Arts Celebration at a Glance

Friday, November 2, 2018 10 AM – 5 PM

Saturday, November 3, 2018 10 AM – 7 PM

Native American Art Vendors

Special Presentations

Music / Dance

Wildlife Shows

Food Trucks / Beverages

Same Day Free Admission to Museum

Free Parking

 

Telling Our Stories Gains Momentum

By Carrie Dilley, Visitor Services and Development Manager

Here on our blog we like to give our readers a sneak peek behind-the-scenes and share the “how” and the “why” behind what we do.  We constantly strive to find new ways to share the Seminole story and help preserve Seminole history.  It’s critical that we stay relevant in the Seminole community and in the Museum field as a whole.

We opened our doors in 1997 and helped make a name for tribal museums across the country.  Over the past 20 years we have created and hosted top-notch exhibits and programs, and vastly increased our collection.  But over the past few years there’s been a desire to do more.  Share more. Exhibit more.  Educate more.

In 2015, we officially embarked on a journey to tell more of the Seminole story within our four walls.  Our current exhibits are great, but they are limited in their scope and only tell a small part of the overall story.  We try to fill in some of the gaps by utilizing our temporary exhibition spaces to highlight topics not covered in our permanent galleries, but we still lack the opportunity to completely immerse our visitors in Seminole history and culture.

By working directly with the Seminole community, our Exhibits team has overseen the development of a plan that utilizes the existing overall space to provide a dynamic experience full of oral histories, vivid imagery, and facets of culture that help us fulfill our mission.  In the exhibit redesign plan, the exterior of the Museum will remain unchanged, but the interior of the structure will be completely re-imagined save for the library, archives, and restrooms.  Studio Techtonic, the exhibition design firm we hired to head up the project, has just completed the schematic plans, which ready us for the next phase in the process—development of the construction documents.  We anticipate we have another 2-3 years until the project is complete, but we grow more excited with each step.

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Last year we launched Telling Our Stories, an $8 million campaign to make the redesign project a reality.  We are proud of what we accomplished and well aware that we couldn’t have done it alone. With the continued support of our donors and the Seminole Tribe of Florida we have reached our initial 500K milestone.

Please make a gift to Telling Our Stories Campaign today to preserve one of the Seminole Tribe of Florida’s most definitive cultural resources.  You can help us ensure that everyone has the opportunity to enjoy the powerful stories the Museum has to tell. Your tax-deductible gift to the Telling Our Stories Campaign, in any amount, impacts our work. Thank you for your continued support.

If you would like to learn more about how you can help us meet our goals, please contact us at: (carriedilley@semtribe.com)  or simply visit www.ahtahthiki.com/donate!

Telling Our Stories Logo

Found in the Swamp: The Search for Fort Shackelford Part II

By Domonique deBeaubien, THPO Collections Manager

If you’re a regular reader of our blog, you may remember a special story titled “Lost in the Swamp: the Search for Fort Shackelford,” where Tribal Historic Preservation Office (THPO) Archaeologist, Shawn Keyte, recounted the harrowing challenges of locating a U.S. Army fort burned to the ground in 1855 by the Seminoles living on Big Cypress.

This winter, THPO Archaeologists Shawn Keyte and Dave Scheidecker continued their search to locate the lost fort.  Shawn and Dave, along with the rest of the Tribal Archaeology crew, were committed to finding the long lost fort. After a long and fruitless field season of metal detection, former THPO Research Coordinator Rechanda Lee commented that the only place they hadn’t looked yet was under the truck.  So that’s exactly what they did!

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The Truck: Sometimes archaeology is underneath it.

Surprisingly, this unusual methodology led to an exciting discovery: square cut nails from the 1800s!  THPO Archaeologists were so encouraged by this find that they put in several new test units to further explore what may be hidden under the surface.

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Archaeologist Shawn Keyte holding a hand-cut square nail found during metal detection.

A test unit is a small square shaped area where archaeologists excavate down carefully, layer by layer, until they hit bedrock.  This helps them see changes in the soil, and accurately document any artifacts that they may find. This new test unit yielded a very exciting discovery:  a burned piece of wood! This may not seem like much, but many 19th century forts were constructed entirely of wood. While we had located a few metal nails and objects that may have dated to the correct time period, what our archaeologists really wanted to find was evidence of the structure itself.  As the crew continued their work, they began to see a series of dark oval stains in the soil, each about the size of a post. As they continued to excavate, they realized that remnants of the posts were actually still preserved! According to Archaeologist Shawn Keyte, this post may have formed part of the stockade (or fence) surrounding the wooden blockhouse.  Officers would have kept quarters in the more robust blockhouse, while soldiers would have erected tents within the confines of the stockade.

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Test Unit 9, with brown oval features and dark ashy soils.

As exciting as this discovery was, the team wanted to ensure that the artifacts were removed from the ground safely. Robin Croskery Howard, Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Conservator, was called out to the site to help extract some of the wood for lab testing and preservation. Finding preserved wood in the Everglades is a rare occurrence. As wood ages in a moist and acidic environment, it often loses its structural integrity and rapidly decomposes. Our team wanted to be extra sure their find didn’t crumble to pieces after exposure to the air!  Shawn, Dave, and Robin worked carefully to extract the wood, as well as collect a sample of the dark soil surrounding each of the posts.

Once back in the THPO Lab, the Collections team set to work.  To get the most precise results possible, we often use radiocarbon dating.  In these instances we send out organic material, like animal bone or charcoal, and measure the amount of Carbon-14 left in the sample.  When a piece of wood is burned, the Carbon-14 in the object begins to slowly break down at a consistent rate.  Scientists are able to measure the amount of Carbon-14 present, and compare it to closely calibrated charts and determine a very precise age. If you look carefully at the soil in the test unit, it’s very dark compared to the light colored soils found nearby.  Such an intense darkening of the soil was caused by a large quantity of ash and charcoal produced by a fire.  The soil sample was packaged up and sent off to a lab in hope that they could extract enough charcoal in the soil to perform C-14 testing to determine when the fire occurred.

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Soil sample from Test Unit 9, with charcoal flecking

In addition to the soil, we also sent out a large piece from one of the wooden posts.  The lab will first use a high powered microscope to determine what type of tree the post was made from, and then use a small segment of the wood sample for C-14 dating!

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The carefully extracted wood sample. Is this part of the Fort Shackelford stockade?

We haven’t received all of the results yet, but some are in!  The charcoal in the soil sample dated to 1840 +/- 30 years.   This is exactly the date range we were hoping for!  This places our charcoal right around the time Fort Shackelford was destroyed, 1855.  While we anxiously await the results of our second C-14 date, we are left to wonder, did we find Fort Shackelford?  The Tribal Archaeology Section heads back out this April to continue the search. Check back soon to find out more!

Discover our Discovery Days!

By Alyssa Boge, Education Coordinator

What do atlatl throwing, swamp cabbage tasting and crafting have in common? They’re all things that you can do as part of our Seminole Discovery Day series!

Discovery Days are a great time to bring friends and family for a hands-on experience to delve deeper into the Seminole Story. Our first Discovery Day of the year celebrates Florida Archaeology Month with our Archaeology Day on March 10th. Meet actual archaeologists and learn about their quests for uncovering Seminole history. You can discover what makes Tribal archaeology unique and how our archaeologists work with community members.

You can also get your hands dirty. Be inspired by archaeological pottery and pinch your own pots out of clay. Play with Legos and examine artifacts to discover how archaeologists decode the past. You can also try using an atlatl! At-ul-at-ul isn’t just fun to say! Before people used bows and arrows for hunting, they used these spear throwers to help them hunt. The atlatl allowed to them to throw farther and with greater force. Finally we also have a special session just for Tribal Members to learn more about historic camp sites on our Tribal Register of Historic Places.

Archaeology Day 2017
Pinch Pot Activity, Archaeology Day 2017
atlatl_pieces
Atlatl, courtesy of https://www.crowcanyon.org/educationproducts/peoples_mesa_verde/archaic_artifacts.asp

Our next Discovery Day- Earth Day- on April 21st will highlight the importance of the Everglades to the Seminoles. Explore the Everglades with a tour along our boardwalk and taste swamp cabbage made from sabal palm trees. You can also find out about hunting with Daniel Tommie in his hunting camp and test your archery skills.

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Museum boardwak
Daniel Tommie
Daniel Tommie in his hunting camp

For crafty visitors, our Art at Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Day on June 28th is a great chance to get creative.  Be inspired by our Museum Village Crafters exhibit and art by the Pemayetv Emahakv students from Brighton Reservation on display. Visitors can meet Seminole artists and create their own crafts including beading keychains, coloring in Seminole scenes, and more.

July 28th, our Seminole War Day, offers more information about this important period in Seminole history. Play our Tools of Survival card game to gain a deeper understanding of the Seminole experience and find out more with a special exhibit.

Our final Discovery Day will highlight our upcoming exhibit “We Are Here: Hands & Voices Making Community Happen.” Understanding any government can be a mystery, but this exhibit will highlight different departments, showcasing the role they play in supporting the Seminole Tribe of Florida. Join us September 15th for special activities.

For the most up-to-date information on our Discovery Days offerings, check out our website: https://www.ahtahthiki.com/programs/.

We hope you will join us for these special programs.  Seminole Story Days, our first major series of public programs in recent years, began in 2016. The series started as part of an internship project with Eden Jumper, then a senior at the Ahfachkee School, whose marketing designs we still use! We followed it up with our Seminole Summer Fun series the same year. In 2017, we renamed the series Seminole Discovery Days and have continued to add programs under this title.  Become part of our new tradition!

Seminole Summer Fun
Seminole Summer Fun Postcard designed by Eden Jumper, 2016