Have you searched our Online Collections yet?

by Mary Beth Rosebrough, Research Coordinator

Cataloging is a major activity here in the Collections Division of the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum. We do it almost all day, every day.  Cataloging means we record in our database, PastPerfect, all the information we have on the item in hand.  Who donated that newspaper clipping? Oh, it was William Boehmer of Brighton Reservation fame!  Did anything else come with it? Yes, as a matter of fact, it came with some black and white photos.  Right – all noted in the record. Recording the information keeps our accreditation with the American Alliance of Museums current and makes those materials available for research.  To access this blog page you clicked on a button at the top of our web page. But did you know you can access much of our collection from our website?  You can! – if you go to the dropdown menu under the Collections tab (right under the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki  logo), click on Online Collections, and then scroll down the page to “Online Collections connection”.   I’ve made it easy for you today:  our “Online Collections” search page is here:

http://semtribe.pastperfect-online.com/34687cgi/mweb.exe?request=ks

Because of the diligent work done daily you have access to a large percentage of our collection and can research or “visit” our collection from your favorite comfy chair.  I hope you are sitting in it right now with your laptop and perusing a bit.  Try searching “patchwork” and you will get over 1300 hits.

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That ought to keep you or any student, maybe a homeschooled high schooler? – busy for most of the afternoon.  Not only are you able to view a very good scan of the object BUT you can also read the information that accompanies it in the database – the description, the size and what it is made of.  Have a look:

http://semtribe.pastperfect-online.com/34687cgi/mweb.exe?request=record;id=8016704B-A69E-40F5-8054-560520439956;type=101

Interested in document research? How about this historic newspaper dated August 18, 1921?

2012-20-085a

http://semtribe.pastperfect-online.com/34687cgi/mweb.exe?request=record;id=CDC46080-403A-4171-8D54-221031109362;type=301

Not only can you read the synopsis to determine the article is about a scouting expedition for the building of the Tamiami Trial, but you can actually read the clipping itself.  Great, right?  And you find out it was part of a notebook belonging to Francis Frost White, a BIA employee in Dania (Hollywood) in the 1930s and 40s. Our collections assistant, Tennile Jackson, very carefully took apart that notebook, page by painstaking page, wearing purple latex gloves, and cataloged each one, recording all the important details.

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And so, because of that attention to detail, we deduce that Francis can provide us with some interesting history. We can use Francis Frost White as our search term and find what else she collected.  Let’s try it and see what comes up:

http://semtribe.pastperfect-online.com/34687cgi/mweb.exe?request=keyword;keyword=francis frost white;dtype=d;subset=300

What we get is 145 hits providing an interesting walk through time and the history of the Seminole Tribe of Florida.

Now you try it!  What are you interested in – guns, the War, beadwork, bandolier bags, baskets, dolls?   All are major holdings that can be searched and researched.  When you put in your search term, look to the right and see the different modules available:  All content (for searching all the modules), Objects (artifacts, not paper), Library (books, journals, and periodicals), Archives (paper documents), Photos, and People.  To refine your search check the most applicable one(s) so you aren’t having to wade through pages of items that don’t suit your purpose.

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I hope you have enjoyed our walk through the online collections on the Museum’s website.  And hopefully you will enjoy the collection from the convenience of your own home – in preparation for your visit to the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki  Museum!  Our exhibits highlight collection pieces to tell the story of the Seminole Tribe of Florida you won’t find in history books.  This month we have an exquisite exhibit, Struggle for Survival, on Seminole removal and survival in the Everglades being installed in the Museum.  It tells a story that has not been told before in this way.  Come and see how our Exhibits team has used our collection to tell the Seminole side of the constant conflict of the 1800s and learn the real story of the Unconquered!

 

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Geocaching

By Oscar Carrasquillo Rivera, Maintenance Shift Supervisor

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What is Geocaching?

Geocaching is a real-world treasure/scavenger hunt that’s happening right now, all around you, anywhere and anytime. It’s very similar to a 160-year-old game called letterboxing; compared to that geocaching has only been active for about 15 years, and has tons of great stories and videos, especially online. There are over 2 million active geocaches and over 6 million geocachers worldwide. So of course we are planning on joining the fun. Here at Big Cypress AH-TAH-THI-KI Museum we like adventures, exploring and learning new things, whether it’s from the past, present or future. If you have never played Geocaching before, here is a new adventure that the whole family should definitely try out if you’re feeling adventurous.

Geocaching 101

There was a geocache close by before, but because of some unfortunate reasons it has been deactivated. Due to popular request the Museum is looking into activating one in the very near future for anyone to come and earn them bragging rights.

I myself have seen how competitive some of these families can get. At one time or another I used to see anywhere from 1-2 to sometimes 9-15 people exchanging stories as well as artifacts, notes with small stories, objects, figurines from as far as from the other side of the world. It’s unbelievable how creative and how small but meaningful it may be. In a way Geocaching helps different families and cultures of the world come together.

All you have to do is go to https://www.geocaching.com understand the rules, sign up, download the app on your smart phone and start scavenge hunting adventures with your GPS.

It could be hidden in something tiny, camouflage, or something big.

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Will you find it….. come on, I’m sure you will.

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Although our adventure is easier but still beautiful, here’s a link of an example(s) you may encounter on another adventure:

Epic Adventure, — Wet Surprise (GC1YV80) — Geocache of the Week Video Edition

 

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Art in the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum Village

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Greetings!  One of the great things about spending our days at the Museum is that we get to enjoy our wonderful boardwalk for lunchtime walks and peaceful escapes from the fast pace of the office.  If you have never visited the Museum, we hope you come and have this same experience.  While you’re here, it’s worth your while to make the journey to our village, which is at the mid-point of the circular trail.   It is the crown jewel of our boardwalk, nestled in the far southwest corner of the cypress dome. When a visitor starts the boardwalk journey, he or she is met with this sign.

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It sits in front of a picturesque banana tree, and it points the way to a “Seminole Camp”. This is our village, but there is nothing on the sign to tell the visitor what experience awaits. As one continues along the mile-long boardwalk through the tranquil trees, this map appears at the halfway point to the village.

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Again it beckons with little information, but hopefully provides incentive to the walker, by showing how far he or she has come. Finally, at the entire boardwalk’s halfway point, an arrow points toward the chickees of the village and nearby ceremonial grounds. If you’re lucky, you may witness a totem pole being carved here by a Seminole artist, or even a wild bird show by our resident falconry expert. But it is by carrying on past this point that you reach our village.

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Until the boardwalk was recently re-designed, it was possible to fail to notice the winding entrance, shrouded by trees. The entrance beckoned some visitors, but others felt they were intruding and passed it by. For the latter category, many glimpsed the chickees and perhaps the fire, and thought they would invade private homes if they ventured any further. This is a funny conclusion for those of us who work at the Museum, but we have heard it’s true! Hopefully now this mistake cannot be made, as one must pass through the village in order to complete the boardwalk journey. Other feedback from visitors who took advantage of the village entrance, stepping off the boardwalk to admire the setting as well as the artwork they found there, has been equally surprising. Those visitors noticed and sometimes commented on the electric fans, refrigerators, radios, and other evidence of modern life, like the smart phones that some of the employees have there. But why should this be surprising? These items are found anywhere that people today work and spend their time. We think it is because some uninformed visitors expect to step into the past when they enter our village. They see a thatched roof, and perhaps people wearing patchwork, and mistakenly think that those individuals are portraying a historic time period, perhaps as long as 75 years ago, when tourist camps began to flourish in Florida.

The postcard below shows a woman and child in one of these historic villages. In such a village, Seminole men and women would demonstrate customs and crafts for visitors. The woman in the postcard is sewing patchwork using a type of antique hand-cranked sewing machine that was used by many Seminole women at the time. But sewing machines like this were not always available, and at one time, Seminole women sewed only by hand. I wonder if visitors to popular villages such as Musa Isle, in Miami, wondered why sewing machines were featured in that camp, the way they wonder the same thing about relatively modern equipment at our village today. The fact of the matter is that in both cases, the people in the village were contemporary artists using their preferred mediums and tools. Hand cranked sewing machines were common in Seminole camps 75 years ago. But today, electric sewing machines are more commonly used by Seminole textile artists. So why wouldn’t today’s artists use contemporary tools and conveniences?

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Historic Postcard in the Museum’s Collection (ATTK Catalog No. 2003.15.233)

We at the Museum would like to revolutionize the way many people think of craftspeople in villages that are open to tourists today. If you enter one of these villages, you are privileged to enter the studios of modern Seminole artists, who constantly design new products in order to keep their art fresh and relevant. Never expect these people to be stuck in the past. It’s easy to imagine why such an artist would use modern tools to produce art quickly, and why they might want a refrigerator, radio, or phone while they work! A tourist camp in the 1940’s and the Museum’s village today have something in common. The craftspeople found therein were and are the modern artists of their time, none of them stuck in the past, portraying people from past decades.

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Artist Lena Cypress makes a basket behind a colorful display of her artwork for sale in the village

In the Museum’s village, arrays of colorful beads and textiles are displayed in shady chickees that provide a welcome refuge from the heat for both the visitor and the artist. If you are lucky, you will be able to see and talk to an artist making a piece of jewelry, a doll, or a basket. Although these techniques have been passed down among artists for generations, innovations in style can be seen in many of the pieces. Woodworking is also a common occurrence. Our woodcarver Jeremiah is happy to show off the stages of making a hatchet, or to talk about the chickee he carved them in, because he also built that structure!

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Whimsical items throughout the village serve as conversation pieces for visiting children and adults alike. A life-like alligator sits next to a very trusting bird, as often happens with the live versions of these creatures. And a stylish archer takes aim at them from a safe distance. A display of collectibles sits in front of a fire under a chickee. The fire is an essential feature for a village. In ours, it protects nearby people by driving mosquitos and more dangerous animals away!

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Now a large welcome sign hangs at the village entrance, and hopefully no visitor will wonder whether they are welcome in the village. On the back, it thanks the visitor in the Mikasuki language for their visit.

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Museum Director Paul Backhouse enjoys viewing the new sign during his lunchtime walk

After you leave the village, a well-placed bench gives you an opportunity to rest and look back on the picturesque village, while a nearby sign lets you congratulate yourself by making it more than halfway around the boardwalk. The remaining walk back to the Museum leads you through what is often the swampiest and most wildlife-filled area of the dome.
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When you visit the Museum, please take the boardwalk journey not only to experience our village, but also to learn from the signs along the way about animals, plants, and the Seminole Tribe of Florida clan system. Very soon there will be a few more signs that describe the village and ceremonial grounds, so come back often to see what’s new! As always, we welcome feedback from our visitors. So tell us what you think on our Facebook page ( https://tinyurl.com/mvtc583 ), or in person when you visit!

Attending the Grand Opening of the New Hollywood Gym

By Tennile Jackson, Collections Assistant

A few weeks ago, I had the pleasure of joining fellow Seminole Tribe of Florida staff, and members of the Tribal community, to celebrate the grand opening of the Howard Tiger Recreation Center in Hollywood. Described as a historic day for the Tribe, the inaguration provided attendees with a firsthand look at the gym’s amenities and enlightened many about the history of the Recreation Department.

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The new Center was constructed over the past year and was built to replace the original gym established over 40 years ago. The two-story facility features a full size basketball court, fitness center, Boys and Girls Club, and culture department. The Center is also home to the Seminole Sports Hall of Fame collection consisting of several trophies, photographs and plaques honoring Seminole athletes. During the construction of the new gym, the items were temporarily housed at the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum for safekeeping. As many may recall, selections from the collection formed a popular exhibit during their stay at the Museum. The items are now back at the gym and currently on display in the Center’s lobby.

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The event began with a ribbon cutting ceremony attended by a large crowd gathered outside the building eagerly awaiting entry. As we made our way through the doors, many bypassed the lobby and headed straight into the brightly lit gym whose entrance was off to the side. Upon entering, we were greeted by colorful banners, basketball hoops suspended from high ceilings, and a glossy hardwood floor emblazoned with symbols representative of the Tribe.

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Members of the Tribal Council and the family of Howard Tiger sat at center court as Moses Jumper Jr. stood between them and acted as the emcee. Throughout the ceremony, many individuals shared sports related stories from their youth while others expressed their gratitude to the Tribal Council who made the construction possible. Several of the speakers also paid tribute to the late Howard Tiger, who established the Tribe’s Recreation Department and mentored a number of the people who took part in the ceremony. The decorated military veteran and gifted athlete was honored with a bronze bust, unveiled at the dedication, to be permanently displayed in the Center’s lobby (pictured above).

The inauguration of this new gym is a testament to the Tribe’s ongoing commitment to serve the Tribal community and impact the lives of future generations.  I was thrilled to be a part of this momentous occasion.

 

Seminole artists featured in new exhibit at FGCU

 by

James Powell, Registrar

and

Tennile Jackson, Collections Assistant

A new exhibit at Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU) features the art of several Seminole artists.  The exhibit is called, Long, Long River: Tradition and Expansion in Native Art, and it is co-curated by FGCU Gallery Coordinator Anica Sturdivant and Seminole artist Jessica Osceola.  The exhibit explores the pull between tradition and contemporary for Native American artists.

FGCU Arts Complex
FGCU Arts Complex
FGCU Gallery Coordinator Anica Sturdivant
FGCU Gallery Coordinator Anica Sturdivant

Seminole artists featured in the exhibit include Noah Billie, Elgin Jumper, Jessica Osceola, Jimmy Osceola, LeRoy Osceola, Samuel Tommie, and Oliver Wareham.  The Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum was pleased to loan to FGCU two artworks for this exhibit.  From the permanent collection, the Museum loaned two painted cow skulls by Noah Billie.

FGCU exhibit "Long, Long River"
FGCU exhibit “Long, Long River”
FGCU exhibit "Long, Long River"
FGCU exhibit “Long, Long River”
Painted cow skull by Seminole artist Noah Billie loaned from the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum to FGCU Gallery.  Accession number 1997.61.2
Painted cow skull by Seminole artist Noah Billie loaned from the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum to FGCU Gallery. Accession number 1997.61.2

On January 9th, several of us from the Museum had the opportunity to travel over to FGCU to attend the exhibit opening.  The well-attended reception included artist introductions, performances, refreshments, and the opportunity to view this excellent exhibit.  The performances included an enjoyable story by Oliver Wareham, and an emotional performance piece by Elgin Jumper.  It was an enjoyable and memorable evening.

Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum Collections Manager Tara Backhouse and Museum Director Paul Backhouse
Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum Collections Manager Tara Backhouse and Museum Director Paul Backhouse

If you can, be sure to make arrangements to go to the exhibit soon, this short exhibit will run only through January 30, 2014.  For more information on the exhibit, visit FGCU Main Gallery’s webpage online at http://artgallery.fgcu.edu/Welcome_to_FGCU_Art_Galleries.html or phone the Gallery at 239.590.7199.